Remembering a Veteran – Ned Felder

  In January 1918 Ned Felder, on the word of a white spectator, was collared, kicked, jailed, and fined for “disloyal talk” towards white troops. This event occurs at the start of the US mobilization for the war. so, Ned hadn’t yet gone to Europe–neither have the marching troops he supposedly disparaged. By April, Ned had entered the 92nd Infantry Division to fight America’s enemies and prove his worth as a citizen. But he soon learned that even though he put on his country’s uniform, he was still regarded as just another Negro – a second class American.  Ned had hopes and aspirations; he lived a few troubled years; and then died in despair.    “The world must be made safe for democracy,” President Wilson said.  Negroes thought it would be hyp ...

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African American Museums

Culture and History Museums In keeping with the mission of My Roots Foundation of honoring our ancestors we present the following release detailing African American Museums in America. These museums often display historical artifacts dedicated to cultural preservation and to telling the stories of African American contributions. Museum tours can be great ways of learning about the accomplishments of our forefathers. Recently we have had many inquiries specifically about how to honor and learn more about ancestors of African American heritage. Hopefully this listing of museums will help you on your journey. Visiting a museum is a great way to get a hands-on feel for African American history. The College Museum in Hampton, Virginia, established in 1868 was the first such museum in America. P ...

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WDYKYA (Who Do You Know You Are)

WDYTYA At my church we’ve just started a series on “Truth.”  It got me thinking about the TV series WDYTYA (Who Do You Think You Are). On the show, guests are given the chance to discover their heritage and learn about the people who lead up to them. There is always that moment when folks discover an ancestor or two with the same occupation or similar jobs and/or career interests. Then there is that ah-ha moment of “Maybe that’s why I feel so comfortable doing X.”   The sermon series pointed out that every day we are bombarded by lies; from social media, news sources, friends, etc. But perhaps the most lies we hear in a day are the ones we tell ourselves. The words we have heard from relatives and caregivers can stick with us for a life time and if these words are lies (or half-truths ...

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A Wise Leader

Emma Didlake, who is African-American and was born in Alabama, is not only believed to be the nation’s oldest surviving veteran, she was a trailblazer, joining the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps in 1943 when she was 38 and a mother of five. Example of a wise leader.  The aged deserve kindness and respect. Here we see President Obama changing his schedule to sit with the oldest known living vet. “Do not rebuke an older man, but exhort him as a father, younger men as brothers, older women as mothers, and with all propriety…” (1 Timothy 5:1-2). See the full story at: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2015/07/17/wwii-veteran-meets-obama/30325507/

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KIDS GAIN INSPIRATION FROM HEARING FAMILY STORIES

Growing up the only child of a single mom I sometimes felt cheated. I wondered what other kids knew about their families. The other boys always seem to know so much about their dad’s and had wonderful stories about the exploits of their dads when they were young. I had no stories. You see, I loved hearing stories. During holidays my Uncle Wilbert would come down from NY and he would sit in the dining room and tell stories of growing up, life in the military, life in the city; he had a story for everything! My cousins Sam and Major would sit around and tell of exploits from their younger days, and although I know stories from my mom and grandmother, they were less exciting and relatable to me as a young boy. That is when I’d feel the loneliness and yearn for a dad to tell me his stories. Wh ...

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